Podcast: A/Prof Clara Tuite – ‘Flash Culture, the Moon’s Late Minions and Gentlemen of the Shade in Colonial Australia’

You can listen to Prof Tuite’s keynote from the Settler Social Identities Conference here:

 

Abstract: This talk engages the rich social, linguistic and aesthetic repertoire of the flash (originally a cant language of thieves and convicts), taking the convict phenomenon of “lag fever” as my starting point, in order to complicate the idea of colonial belatedness. My discussion encompasses the flash lexicons of Grose’s Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue (1811) and the New and Comprehensive Vocabulary of the Flash Language (1819) that accompanied the convict Memoirs of James Hardy Vaux, as well as the popular Romanticism of Pierce Egan’s Life in London (1820), in order to explore Regency flash — simultaneously classical and new — as an example of the transformative capacity of the lag, a retroactive celebration of the disjunctive and anachronistic powers of quoting and recirculating in a new time and place.

I focus this discussion through a consideration of how the flash mediates a range of masculine social identities in Regency London and colonial Australia. Tracing the Byron-D’Orsay dandy type inaugurated in Regency Mayfair — that iconic silhouette of modern urban masculinity — alongside other identities such as swell, flash man, and wild colonial, my talk connects genealogies of masculine style and self-fashioning, and print-visual form, with the social arenas of fashionability, respectability, exile, convictism and settler culture, across Britain, Ireland, Europe and Australia. As well as Vaux, my colonial protagonists include William Romaine Govett and Thomas Griffiths Wainewright.

My exploration of the interpenetration of flash cultures in colonial Australia and Regency London — across print culture, visual media and social processes — hopes to throw new light on the liminal yet transformative Regency cultures of scandalous celebrity, exile and convictism.

 

Clara Tuite teaches at the University of Melbourne, where she is a member of the Research Unit in Enlightenment, Romanticism and Contemporary Culture. Her most recent book Lord Byron and Scandalous Celebrity (Cambridge University Press, 2015) was awarded the Elma Dangerfield Prize. Current projects include a study of trans-European literary Romanticism and the media of romantic love, and, with Gillian Russell, a project on Regency Romanticism in Ireland, Britain and Australia, entitled ‘Flash Regency’, supported by the Australian Research Council.

Conference Programme

 

SETTLER SOCIAL IDENTITIES

24-25 July 2018

Humanities Institute, University College Dublin

 Please find the link to the conference programme here: Settler Social Identities Programme

 

For any enquiries please contact: settlersocialidentity@gmail.com.

 

The conference is generously supported by the Humanities Institute and UCD College of Arts and Humanities.

 

 

Image: ‘Conversazione at the new Congregational Hall’, wood engraving by Samuel Calvert, 1879. Courtesy of the State Library of Victoria.

 

Conference Keynote Day 2: Wednesday 25 July 11:30am

 

Lag Fever: Flash Culture, the Moon’s Late Minions and Gentlemen of the Shade in Colonial Australia 

A/Prof. Clara Tuite (University of Melbourne)

Wednesday 25 July 2018

11:30am

Humanities Institute of Ireland (UCD)

 

LAG FEVER. A term of ridicule applied to men who being under sentence of transportation, pretend illness, to avoid being sent from the gaol to the hulks.

Francis Grose, Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue (1811)

 

This talk engages the rich social, linguistic and aesthetic repertoire of the flash (originally a cant language of thieves and convicts), taking the convict phenomenon of “lag fever” as my starting point, in order to complicate the idea of colonial belatedness. My discussion encompasses the flash lexicons of Grose’s Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue (1811) and the New and Comprehensive Vocabulary of the Flash Language (1819) that accompanied the convict Memoirs of James Hardy Vaux, as well as the popular Romanticism of Pierce Egan’s Life in London (1820), in order to explore Regency flash — simultaneously classical and new — as an example of the transformative capacity of the lag, a retroactive celebration of the disjunctive and anachronistic powers of quoting and recirculating in a new time and place.

I focus this discussion through a consideration of how the flash mediates a range of masculine social identities in Regency London and colonial Australia. Tracing the Byron-D’Orsay dandy type inaugurated in Regency Mayfair — that iconic silhouette of modern urban masculinity — alongside other identities such as swell, flash man, and wild colonial, my talk connects genealogies of masculine style and self-fashioning, and print-visual form, with the social arenas of fashionability, respectability, exile, convictism and settler culture, across Britain, Ireland, Europe and Australia. As well as Vaux, my colonial protagonists include William Romaine Govett and Thomas Griffiths Wainewright.

My exploration of the interpenetration of flash cultures in colonial Australia and Regency London — across print culture, visual media and social processes — hopes to throw new light on the liminal yet transformative Regency cultures of scandalous celebrity, exile and convictism.

 

Clara Tuite teaches at the University of Melbourne, where she is a member of the Research Unit in Enlightenment, Romanticism and Contemporary Culture. Her most recent book Lord Byron and Scandalous Celebrity (Cambridge University Press, 2015) was awarded the Elma Dangerfield Prize. Current projects include a study of trans-European literary Romanticism and the media of romantic love, and, with Gillian Russell, a project on Regency Romanticism in Ireland, Britain and Australia, entitled “Flash Regency,” supported by the Australian Research Council.

For any enquiries please contact: settlersocialidentity@gmail.com. The conference is generously supported by the Humanities Institute and UCD College of Arts and Humanities.

      

Call For Papers

Confirmed keynotes:

Dr Natasha Eaton (University College London)

A/Professor Clara Tuite (University of Melbourne)

This two-day conference, to be held at the Humanities’ Institute, University College Dublin, will bring together an international network of scholars in the interdisciplinary field of settler colonial studies to consider the role that settler literary and social institutions played in the formation of colonial and imperial identities in the long nineteenth century.  Historian James Belich’s influential exploration of the economic history of the ‘settler explosion’ that created what Belich terms the ‘Anglo World’ between 1815 and 1920 inaugurated a reassessment of the political, economic and cultural influence of Anglophone settler colonies. Over the past decade, scholars in the interdisciplinary field of nineteenth-century settler studies have begun to argue that, far from simply replicating a series of ‘little Britains’ across the globe, the ‘empire migrants’ of the Anglophone settler colonies developed new forms of national and trans-national identification independent of (albeit in relation to) British national and imperial identities (Harper and Constantine). Interdisciplinary in nature, this conference aims to analyse the role popular entertainments, associational life and literary culture have played in defining and disseminating these new forms of national and trans-national belonging in the British settler colonies of Africa, Asia, North America and Australasia.

Responding to Russell and Tuite’s call to consider sociability as ‘a text in its own right’, this conference will examine the role literary sociability and associational life performed in defining and regulating the ideologies of citizenship in the settler colonies. Focusing on a broad definition of rational recreation this conference will explore how popular reading practices, circulating libraries, public lectures, soirées, exhibitions, clubs, societies and other associations created and reinforced notions of ‘respectability’ and ‘improvement’ that both projected an image of coherent community in nascent settler colonies, and defined who was included and excluded from these new colonial formations. Focusing on the popular and recreational, we encourage papers which engage with understudied facets of colonial experience including the experiences of women, working-class settlers, and indigenous and minority groups. In considering webs of cultural association we also create space for approaches to the field which privilege intra-colonial and trans-peripheral networks of influence, complicating the traditional periphery/metropole binary.

We welcome proposals for individual twenty-minute papers or three paper panels on the following themes:

  • Settler literary and cultural institutions and associational life
  • Intra-imperial or trans-regional intellectual networks in which settler literary and cultural institutions proved important ‘nodes’
  • Colonial print, visual and material culture
  • Popular lecturing and popular reading in the colonies
  • Methodological papers about approaches to the study of settler cultures and societies
  • Colonial exhibitions and Worlds’ Fairs
  • The relationship between literary culture and the (trans)formation of national, colonial and imperial identities
  • The relationship between cultures of intellectual ‘improvement’ and ideologies of exclusion based on class, race, gender in the colonial context
  • The ways minority groups used sociability to gain influence across these intra-colonial and trans-peripheral networks.

Guide for submissions:

Please send 250-word abstracts with a short biography to the conferenced email address: settlersocialidentity@gmail.com.

If you are submitting a proposal for a panel, please include an abstract for each paper (250 words) and a summary of the panel theme (300 words). Please include short biographies for all the speakers on the panel.

All proposals should include your name, email address, and academic affiliation (if applicable).

Deadline for submissions: Tuesday 1 May 2018

Organising Committee:

Dr. Sarah Comyn

Dr. Lara Atkin

Dr. Sarah Sharp

Dr. Kathryn Milligan

For any enquiries please contact: settlersocialidentity@gmail.com

The conference is generously supported by the Humanities Institute and UCD College of Arts and Humanities.